He jabbed2 a finger at the proposal. "Next time you want to change anything, ask me first," he said.
  How dare he treat me like that, I thought. I had changed one long sentence, and corrected grammar, something I thought I was paid to do.
  It"s not that I hadn"t been warned. Other women who had worked my job before me called Albert names I couldn"t repeat. One coworker took me aside the first day. "He"s personally responsible for two different secretaries leaving the firm," she whispered.
  As the weeks went by, I grew to despise Albert. His actions made me question much that I believed in, such as turning the other cheek and loving your enemies. Albert quickly slapped a verbal insult on any cheek turned his way.
  One day another of his episodes left me in tears. I stormed into his office, prepared to lose my job if needed, but not before I let the man know how I felt. I opened the door and Albert glanced up. "What?" he asked abruptly.
  Suddenly I knew what I had to do. After all, he deserved it.
  I sat across from him and said calmly, "Albert, the way you"ve been treating me is wrong. I"ve never had anyone speak to me that way. it"s wrong, and I can"t allow it to continue."
  Albert snickered3 nervously and leaned back in his chair. I closed my eyes briefly. God help me, I prayed.
  "I want to make you a promise, I will be a friend," I said. "I will treat you as you deserve to be treated, with respect and kindness. You deserve that. Everybody does." I slipped out of the chair and closed the door behind me.
  Albert avoided me the rest of the week. Proposals and letters appeared on my desk while I was at lunch, and my corrected versions were not seen again. I brought cookies to the office one day and left a batch4 on his desk. Another day Ileft a note. "Hope your day is going great," it read.
  Over the next few weeks, Albert reappeared. He was reserved, but there were no other episodes. Coworkers cornered5 me in the break room. "Guess you got to Albert," they said.
  I shook my head. "Albert and I are becoming friends," I said in faith. I refused to talk about him. Every time I saw Albert in the hall, I smiled at him: After all, that"s what friends do.
  One year after our "talk," I discovered I had breast cancer. I was thirty-two, the mother of three beautiful young children, and scared. The cancer had metastasized6 to my lymph nodes7 and the statistics were not great for long-term survival. After my surgery, friends and loved ones visited and tried to find the right words. No one knew what to say, and many said the wrong things. Others wept, and I tried to encourage them. I clung to8 hope myself.
  One day, Albert stood awkwardly in the doorway of my small, darkenedhospital room. I waved him in with a smile. He walked over to my bed and without a word placed a bundle beside me. Inside the package lay several bulbs.
,更多精彩资讯尽在{?域名};" />

旷视科技Face++与鲜生活臻战微合干吃水规划新发行业态

真的了松养金鱼的生趣,分类,种类特点及缺隐?

爱的教育读后感:肝拥有腔水怎么治水疗?第叁代光透力又生技术源头消水

2019年12月03日 04:44

我苦思冥想,纠结到底是用π表示还是取近似值3。14呢?取π吧,可π是无理数,是无限不循环小数,不可能准确表示出的,可取了近似值就不精确了。就这样,我稀里糊涂地答完了最后的压轴题。


  As a little boy, there was nothing I liked better than Sunday aftemoons at my grandfather"s farm in western Pennsylvania. Surrounded by miles of winding stonewalls, the house and barn provided endless hours of fun for a city kid like me. I was used to parlors neat as a pin that seemed to whisper, "Not to be touched!"
  I can still remember one afternoon when I was eight years old. Since my first visit to the farm, I"d wanted more than anything to be allowed to climb the stonewalls surrounding the property. My parents would never approve. The walls were old; some stones were missing, others loose and crumbling. Still, my yearning to scramble across those walls grew so strong. One spring afternoon, I summoned all my courage and entered the living room, where the adults had gathered after dinner.
  "I, uh, I want to climb the stonewalls," I said hesitantly. Everyone looked up. "Can I climb the stonewalls?" Instantly a chorus went up from the women in the room. "Heavens, no!" they cried in dismay. "You"ll hurt yourself!" I wasn"t too disappointed; the response was just as I"d expected. But before I could leave the room, I was stopped by my grandfather" s booming voice. "Hold on just a minute," I heard him say, "Let the boy climb the stonewalls. He has to learn to do things for himself."
  "Scoot," he said to me with a wink, "and come and see me when you get back." For the next two and a half hours I climbed those old walls and had the time of my life. Later I met with my grandfather to tell him about my adventure. I"ll never forget what he said. "Fred," he said, grinning, "you made this day a special day just by being yourself. Always remember, there"s only one person in this whole world like you, and I like you exactly as you are."
  Many years have passed since then, and today I host the television program Mister Rogers" Neighborhood, seen by millions of children throughout America. There have been changes over the years, but one thing remains the same: my message to children at the end of almost every visit, "There"s only one person in this whole world like you, and people can like you exactly as you are."
  
  我小时候最喜欢在爷爷的农场里度过每一个星期天的下午。爷爷的农场在宾州西部。农场四周都围上了绵延几英里的石墙。房子和谷仓给我这个城市男孩带来了无穷的快乐时光。我习惯了城里非常整洁的客厅,似乎在低声说:“不要摸!”
  我仍能记得我8岁那年的一天下午的情景。因为我第一次去农场,所以我很想能让自己爬农场四周的那些石墙。父母绝不会同意。这些墙年深日久,有的石头不见了,有的石头松动倒塌。然而,我渴望爬这些墙的欲望非常强烈。一个春天的下午,我鼓足勇气,走进客厅,大人们午饭后都聚在这里。
  “我,呃,我想爬那些石墙,”我犹豫地说道。大家都抬起头。“我能去爬那些石墙吗?”屋里的女人们马上齐声叫了起来。“天哪,不能!”她们惊慌地叫道,“你会伤着自己的!”我并没有太失望,我早就预料会是这样的回答。但还没等我离开客厅,爷爷低沉的声音拦住了我。“等一会儿,”我听到他说。“让孩子爬那些石墙吧。他必须学会自己做事。”
  “快走吧,”他对我眨眨眼说。“你回来后找我。”接下来的两个半小时,我爬起了这些古老的石墙,别提有多开心了。后来,我把自己的冒险经历告诉了爷爷。我永远也不会忘记他说过的话。“弗雷德,”他咧嘴笑道。“你做了一回自己,让这个日子不同凡响。永远记住,整个世界只有一个你,而且我喜欢真实的你。”
  许多年过去了,现在我主持电视节目《罗杰斯先生的街坊四邻》,全美国几百万儿童收看。几年过后,节目已经发生了一些变化,但有一点没变:几乎每期节目后我都会传递给孩子们这样一个信息。“这个世界上只有一个你,人们都喜欢真实的你。”
  
  注释:
  1 neat as a pin极为整洁
  2 property n.房产;地产;房地产
  3 crumbling adj.倒塌的
  4 scramble vi. 攀登;爬上;登上
  5 summon vt.鼓起;奋起;使出
  6 chorus n. 一齐;齐声;异口同声说的话
  7 dismay n. 沮丧;灰心
  8 booming adj. 发出低沉声音的
爱的教育读后感
  Once a circle missed a wedge1. The circle wanted to be whole, so it went around looking for its missing piece. But because it was incomplete and therefore could roll only very slowly, it admired the flowers along the way. It chatted with worms. It enjoyed the sunshine. It found lots of different pieces, but none of them fit, So it left them all by the side of the road and kept on searching. Then one day the circle found a piece that fit perfectly. It was so happy. Now it could be whole, with nothing missing. It incorporated the missing piece into itself and began to roll. Now that it was a perfect circle, it could roll very fast, too fast to notice the flowers or talking to the worms. When it realized how different the world seemed when it rolled so quickly, it stopped, left its found piece by the side of the road and rolled slowly away.
  The lesson of the story, I suggested, was that in some strange sense we are more whole when we are missing something. The man who has everything is in some ways a poor man. He will never know what it feels like to yearn2, to hope, to nourish3 his soul with the dream of something better. He will never know the experience of having someone who loves him give him something he has always wanted or never had.
  There is a wholeness about the person who has come to terms with his limitations, who has been brave enough to let go of his uealistic dreams and not feel like a failure for doing so. There is a wholeness about the man or woman who has learned that he or she is strong enough to go through a tragedy and survive, who can lose someone and still feel like a complete person.
  Life is not a trap4 set for us by God so that he can condemn us for failing. Life is not a spelling bee, where no matter how many words you"ve gotten right, you"re disqualified if you make one mistake. Life is more like a baseball season, where even the best team loses one -- third of its games and even the worst team has its days of brilliance. Our goal is to win more games than we lose.
  When we accept that imperfection is part of being human, and when we can continue rolling through life and appreciate it, we will have achieved a wholeness that others can only aspire to. That, I believe, is what God asks of us -- not "Be perfect", not "Don"t even make a mistake", but "Be whole. "
  If we are brave enough to love, strong enough to forgive, generous enough to rejoice5 in another"s happiness, and wise enough to know there is enough love to go around for us all, then we can achieve a fulfillment that no other living creature will ever know.
  
  从前有一只圆圈缺了一块楔子。圆圈想保持完整,便四处寻找失去的那块楔子。由于它不完整,所以只能滚动很慢。一路上,它对花儿露出羡慕之色。它与蠕虫谈天侃地。它还欣赏到了阳光之美。圆圈找到了许许多多不同的配件,但是没有一件能完美地与它相配。所以,它将它们统统弃置路旁,继续寻觅。终于有一天,它找到了一个完美的配件。圆圈是那样地高兴,现在它可以说是完美无缺了。它装好配件,然后滚动起来。既然它已成了一个完整的圆圈,所以滚动得非常快,快得以至于无暇观赏花儿,也无暇与蠕虫倾诉心声。圆圈快奔急驰,发现眼中的世界变得如此不同,于是,它不禁停了下来,将找到的那个配件留在路旁,又开始了慢慢地滚动。
  我觉得这个故事告诉我们,从某种奇妙意义上讲,当我们失去了一些东西时反而感到更加完整。一个拥有一切的人其实在某些方面是个穷人。他永远也体会不到什么是渴望、期待以及对美好梦想的感悟。他也永远不会有这样一种体验:一个爱他的人送给他某种他梦寐以求的或者从未拥有过的东西意味什么。
  人生的完整性在于一个人知道如何面对他的缺陷,如何勇敢地摒弃那些不现实的幻想而又不以此为缺憾。人生的完整性还在于一个男人或女人懂得这样一个道理:他(她)发现自己能勇敢面对人生悲剧而继续生存,能够在失去亲人后依然表现出一个完整的人的风范。
  人生不是上帝为谴责我们的缺陷而给我们布下的陷阱。人生也不是一场拼字游戏比赛。不管你拼出多少单词,一旦出现了一个错误,你便前功尽弃。人生更像是一个棒球赛季。即使最好的球队比赛也会输掉1/3,而最差的球队也有春风得意的日子。我们的目标就是多赢球,少输球。
  我们接受了不完整性是人类本性的一部分,我们不断地进行人生滚动并能意识到其价值,我们就会完成完整人生的过程。而对于别人来讲,这只能是一个梦想。我相信这就是上帝对我们的要求:不求“完美”,也不求“永不犯错误”,而是求得人生的“完整”。
  如果我们勇敢得能够去爱,坚强得能够去宽容,大度得能够去分享他人的幸福,明智得能够理解身边充满爱,那么我们就能取得别的生物所不能取得的成就。
  
  注释
  ①wedge n.楔 vt.楔入;挤入
  ②yearn vi.想念,怀念,向往
  ③nourish vt.提供养分,养育
  ④trap vt.设陷阱捕捉;诱捕
  ⑤rejoice vi.欣喜,高兴

您的身体怎么样?工作时要注意身体,生病时不要死撑着,吃饭要多吃些。

爱的教育读后感
  The poor are very wonderful people. One evening we went out and we picked up four people from the street. And one of them was in a most terrible condition, and I told the sisters: You take care of the other three. I take care of this one who looked worse. So I did for her all that my love can do. I put her in bed, and there was such a beautiful smile on her face. She took hold of my hand as she said just the words "thank you" and she died. I could not help but examine my conscience1 before her and I asked what would I say if I was in her place. And my answer was very simple. I would have tried to draw a little attention to myself. I would have said I am hungry, that I am dying, I am cold, I am in pain, or something, but she gave me much more -- she gave me her grateful love. And she died with a smile on her face. As did that man whom we picked up from the drain2, half eaten with worms, and we brought him to the home. "I have lived like an animal in the street, but I am going to die like an angel, loved and cared for." And it was so wonderful to see the greatness of that man who could speak like that, who could die like that without blaming anybody, without cursing anybody, without comparing anything. Like an angel -- this is the greatness of our people. And that is why we believe what Jesus had said: I was hungry, I was naked, I was homeless, I was unwanted, unloved, uncared for, and you did it to me.
  I believe that we are not real social workers. We may be doing social work in the eyes of the people, but we are really contemplative3 in the heart of the world. For we are touching the body of Christ twenty-four hours... And I think that in our family we don"t need bombs and guns, to destroy, to bring peace, just get together, love one another, bring that peace, that joy, that strength of presence of each other in the home. And we will be able to overcome all the evil that is in the world.
  And with this prize that I have received as a Prize of Peace, I am going to try to make the home for many people who have no home. Because I believe that love begins at home, and if we can create a home for the poor I think that more and more love will spread. And we will be able through this understanding love to bring peace be the good news to the poor. The poor in our own family first, in our country and in the world. To be able to do this, our sisters, our lives have to be woven with prayer. They have to be woven with Christ to be able to understand, to be able to share. Because to be woven with Christ is to be able to understand, to be able to share. Because today there is so much suffering... When I pick up a person from the street, hungry, I give him a plate of rice, a piece of bread, I have satisfied. I have removed that hunger. But a person who is shut out, who feels unwanted, unloved, terrified, the person who has been thrown out from society --that poverty is so full of hurt and so unbearable... And so let us always meet each other with a smile, for the smile is the beginning of love, and once we begin to love each other naturally we want to do something.

爱的教育读后感:地脊正西“80后”借文花样翻新路就续古建技艺生

我记得那个暑假,您吃得像一个特别圆的大西瓜,现在瘦了吗?

爱的教育读后感
  Once a circle missed a wedge1. The circle wanted to be whole, so it went around looking for its missing piece. But because it was incomplete and therefore could roll only very slowly, it admired the flowers along the way. It chatted with worms. It enjoyed the sunshine. It found lots of different pieces, but none of them fit, So it left them all by the side of the road and kept on searching. Then one day the circle found a piece that fit perfectly. It was so happy. Now it could be whole, with nothing missing. It incorporated the missing piece into itself and began to roll. Now that it was a perfect circle, it could roll very fast, too fast to notice the flowers or talking to the worms. When it realized how different the world seemed when it rolled so quickly, it stopped, left its found piece by the side of the road and rolled slowly away.
  The lesson of the story, I suggested, was that in some strange sense we are more whole when we are missing something. The man who has everything is in some ways a poor man. He will never know what it feels like to yearn2, to hope, to nourish3 his soul with the dream of something better. He will never know the experience of having someone who loves him give him something he has always wanted or never had.
  There is a wholeness about the person who has come to terms with his limitations, who has been brave enough to let go of his uealistic dreams and not feel like a failure for doing so. There is a wholeness about the man or woman who has learned that he or she is strong enough to go through a tragedy and survive, who can lose someone and still feel like a complete person.
  Life is not a trap4 set for us by God so that he can condemn us for failing. Life is not a spelling bee, where no matter how many words you"ve gotten right, you"re disqualified if you make one mistake. Life is more like a baseball season, where even the best team loses one -- third of its games and even the worst team has its days of brilliance. Our goal is to win more games than we lose.
  When we accept that imperfection is part of being human, and when we can continue rolling through life and appreciate it, we will have achieved a wholeness that others can only aspire to. That, I believe, is what God asks of us -- not "Be perfect", not "Don"t even make a mistake", but "Be whole. "
  If we are brave enough to love, strong enough to forgive, generous enough to rejoice5 in another"s happiness, and wise enough to know there is enough love to go around for us all, then we can achieve a fulfillment that no other living creature will ever know.
  
  从前有一只圆圈缺了一块楔子。圆圈想保持完整,便四处寻找失去的那块楔子。由于它不完整,所以只能滚动很慢。一路上,它对花儿露出羡慕之色。它与蠕虫谈天侃地。它还欣赏到了阳光之美。圆圈找到了许许多多不同的配件,但是没有一件能完美地与它相配。所以,它将它们统统弃置路旁,继续寻觅。终于有一天,它找到了一个完美的配件。圆圈是那样地高兴,现在它可以说是完美无缺了。它装好配件,然后滚动起来。既然它已成了一个完整的圆圈,所以滚动得非常快,快得以至于无暇观赏花儿,也无暇与蠕虫倾诉心声。圆圈快奔急驰,发现眼中的世界变得如此不同,于是,它不禁停了下来,将找到的那个配件留在路旁,又开始了慢慢地滚动。
  我觉得这个故事告诉我们,从某种奇妙意义上讲,当我们失去了一些东西时反而感到更加完整。一个拥有一切的人其实在某些方面是个穷人。他永远也体会不到什么是渴望、期待以及对美好梦想的感悟。他也永远不会有这样一种体验:一个爱他的人送给他某种他梦寐以求的或者从未拥有过的东西意味什么。
  人生的完整性在于一个人知道如何面对他的缺陷,如何勇敢地摒弃那些不现实的幻想而又不以此为缺憾。人生的完整性还在于一个男人或女人懂得这样一个道理:他(她)发现自己能勇敢面对人生悲剧而继续生存,能够在失去亲人后依然表现出一个完整的人的风范。
  人生不是上帝为谴责我们的缺陷而给我们布下的陷阱。人生也不是一场拼字游戏比赛。不管你拼出多少单词,一旦出现了一个错误,你便前功尽弃。人生更像是一个棒球赛季。即使最好的球队比赛也会输掉1/3,而最差的球队也有春风得意的日子。我们的目标就是多赢球,少输球。
  我们接受了不完整性是人类本性的一部分,我们不断地进行人生滚动并能意识到其价值,我们就会完成完整人生的过程。而对于别人来讲,这只能是一个梦想。我相信这就是上帝对我们的要求:不求“完美”,也不求“永不犯错误”,而是求得人生的“完整”。
  如果我们勇敢得能够去爱,坚强得能够去宽容,大度得能够去分享他人的幸福,明智得能够理解身边充满爱,那么我们就能取得别的生物所不能取得的成就。
  
  注释
  ①wedge n.楔 vt.楔入;挤入
  ②yearn vi.想念,怀念,向往
  ③nourish vt.提供养分,养育
  ④trap vt.设陷阱捕捉;诱捕
  ⑤rejoice vi.欣喜,高兴

春天的风像细雨一样,沐浴着小草,滋润着心田。春天的风像鲜花般的盛开,吹在脸上柔柔的,万物复苏的样子。

爱的教育读后感
  Zeng Zi was one of Confucius" students. Once, Zeng Zi"s wife was going shopping. Because the child was crying loudly, she promised the child that she would kill their pig to treat him after she returned home. After she returned, Zeng Zi captured to butcher the pig. His wife stopped him, saying " I was kidding the child." Zeng zi said: "There is no kidding with the children, because they know little and they usually imitate their parents and follow their instructions. If you cheat them, it is the same as teaching them to cheat the others." So Zeng Zi killed the pig, because he knew that sincerity and keeping one"s words are the essentials of conducting oneself. If he broke his words, he might keep his pig, but he would leave a unforgettable shadow in his child"s heart.
  
  曾子是孔子的学生。有一次,曾子的妻子准备去赶集,由于孩子哭闹不已,曾子妻许诺孩子回来后杀猪给他吃。曾子妻从集市上回来后,曾子便捉猪来杀,妻子阻止说:“我不过是跟孩子闹着玩的。”曾子说:“和孩子是不可说着玩的。小孩子不懂事,凡事跟着父母学,听父母的教导。现在你哄骗他,就是教孩子骗人啊”。于是曾子把猪杀了。曾子深深懂得,诚实守信、说话算话是做人的基本准则。若失言不杀猪,那么家中的猪保住了,但却在一个纯洁的孩子的心灵上留下不可磨灭的阴影。

爱的教育读后感:没拥有想到,此雕刻些食物补养血效实此雕刻么赞!孕妈咪快看度过去


  When World War II ended, there were ruins everywhere. American sociologist David Popenoe visited a German family living in the basement.
   After leaving there, one of the people going the same way asked Popenoe, "Do you think they can rebuild their home?"
   "Surely!" Popenoe answered verily.
   "Why did you answer so surely?"
   "What did you see they put on the table in the basement?"
   "A vase of flowers."
   "Right," Popenoe said, "any nation in such a plight that has not yet forgotten the love of beauty must be able to rebuild her homes on the ruins."
   This story tells us how admirable and inspiring the people in despair who could still pursue the flower of hope were!
  
  第二次世界大战结束,到处是一片废墟。美国社会学家戴维·波普诺去访问一户住在地下室里的德国居民。
  离开那里之后,同行的人问波普诺:“你看他们能重建家园吗?”
  “一定能!”波普诺肯定地回答。
  “为什么回答得这么肯定呢?”
  “你看到他们在地下室的桌上放着什么吗?”
  “一瓶鲜花。”
  “对,”波普诺说。“任何一个民族,处在这样困苦的境地,还没有忘记爱美,那就一定能在废墟上重建家园。”
  这个故事告诉我们在绝望中仍能追寻希望之花的人,是多么令人敬佩与振奋!
爱的教育读后感

流星陨落,之余下空中绚丽的身影;云光变换,之留下那一抹灿烂的光;海浪打击,至多下海面转瞬即逝的静……嗅着熟悉的略带咸味的海风,还有阳光的温暖,云遗留的清香。风是大自然的舞者,在沙滩上的旋转,在海面上跳跃,海鸥点点从远处飞来,似乎秩序井然,却在沐浴海风的一瞬间一面迎着风,一面追随海风的步伐。

爱的教育读后感:爽快!伯劳动镇此雕刻伙以“房屋修盖越界”为由破开变质人家财物的立功团弄伙被打掉落!


  In The Origin Diet, dietitian Elizabeth Somer asserts that certain cravings were central to human survival and evolution. "Fat and sugar were scarce hundreds of thousands of years ago," she writes. "Fat was a precious source of calories (supplying more than twice the calories per gram of either protein or starch), and our ancestors had no need to develop an appetite shutoff valve for fat. Instead, when they found fatty food, they ate all they could get and developed an unlimited capacity to store extra calories."
  The quest for fat and sugar, Somer believes, is now hardwired into our brains, governed by dozens of chemicals including endorphins. Serotonin, for example, is the "feel good" chemical. When levels are low, we seem to crave sweets and carbs, which raise serotonin and improve mood. This may help explain why many women crave chocolate near their periods.
  What about the cravings that many pregnant women experience? Growing research suggests that odd food yearnings - and food aversions - may protect the fetus. Some pregnant women lose the desire to drink coffee or wine and turn green at the sight of fish, meat, eggs or vegetables. Instead, they crave sweets, fruits (especially citrus) and dairy products.
  One explanation: These foods are least likely to carry harmful organisms or natural toxins. "It may be your body is telling you to keep your fetus away from anything that might be toxic," says Frances Largeman, managing editor of FoodFit.com, a website promoting healthy eating habits.
  Largeman acknowledges that the theory doesn"t account for why some pregnant women hunger for pickles and others for apple strudel. Cravings are difficult to explain scientifically, she says, "because people don"t eat nutrients; they eat food." And everybody"s preferences differ.
  One explanation: These foods are least likely to carry harmful organisms or natural toxins. "It may be your body is telling you to keep your fetus away from anything that might be toxic," says Frances Largeman, managing editor of FoodFit.com, a website promoting healthy eating habits.
  Largeman acknowledges that the theory doesn"t account for why some pregnant women hunger for pickles and others for apple strudel. Cravings are difficult to explain scientifically, she says, "because people don"t eat nutrients; they eat food." And everybody"s preferences differ.
  Some experts think cravings are as much a reflection of our social and psychological makeup as they are of our physiological impulses. "Food adds solace to our lives," says Jeff Hampl, a spokesman for the American Dietetic Association. "Often, cravings are tied to a childhood experience and good feelings associated with it. There"s a subconscious desire to replace those emotions."
  This would explain my predilection for rapini, since my mother serves it every Thanksgiving. Yet regardless of the reason, Largeman — who craves salmon sometimes - thinks you should satisfy a craving when it strikes. "A craving usually just gets worse," She says, "and it could lead to binging."

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